FY 2018 Sponsored Research Funding Highlights

During FY ´18, faculty brought in $20.3 million in sponsored awards, grants and contracts, which is an increase of 34 percent from last year and the largest amount ever for the college.

Although the majority of our sponsored research comes from federal agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Department of Education, our diverse funding portfolio includes numerous awards from industry, private foundations and non-profit organizations.

Below are examples of notable awards received in FY 2018. These awards reflect our values and commitment to embracing innovative approaches, conducting community-based research with diverse populations, promoting interdisciplinary collaboration and integrating students. These projects have the potential to impact population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

 

Notable grants in FY 2018 include

 

Omega-3 Fatty Acids and the Control of Fatty Liver Disease

Funded by the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; $1,323,000 for four years.

Led by PI Donald Jump, Professor in the School of Biological and Population Health Sciences.

This study examines how non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) have increased in parallel with central obesity. Dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6,ω3) prevents the onset and blocks the progression of NASH. This application will define the mechanisms for the beneficial effect of DHA on liver health.

 

Effects of Whole Body Vibration Exposure on Physiological Stresses in Mining Heavy Equipment Vehicle Operators

Funded by the Alpha Foundation for the Improvement of Mine Safety and Health, Inc.; $150,000 for 18 months.

Led by PI Jay Kim, Assistant Professor in the School of Biological and Population Health Sciences.

This study will identify underlying injury mechanisms and clarify exposure-response relationships between Whole Body Vibration (WBV) exposure and musculoskeletal stresses by measuring established markers of physiological stress

 

Complex Systems Analysis of the Impact of Alcohol on Bone in Non-human Primates

Funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health; $1,638,419 for five years.

Led by PI Urszula Iwaniec, Professor in the School of Biological and Population Health Sciences.

This study will evaluate the impact of varying alcohol consumption on bone in a non-human primate model that mimics the full range of human drinking behavior. This research is important because of the large economic, social, and personal burden associated with poor bone health. Dr. Iwaniec will collaborate with colleagues from Baylor University.

 

Immunoglobulin Stability in the Infant Gut

Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; $815,354 for two years.

Led by PI David Dallas, Assistant Professor in the School of Biological and Population Health Sciences.

The objective of this study is to determine the extent to which immunoglobulins are digested within the newborn infant. Milk immunoglobulins are known to be important for newborn and infant immune development and immunoprotection, yet the extent to which these proteins survive intact within the infant digestive tract and retain immunologic function remains, surprisingly, unknown.

 

Diet and Microbiome Interactions during Age-Related Inflammation

Funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture; $470,667 for three years.

Led by PI Emily Ho, Director for the Moore Family Center for Whole Grain Foods, Nutrition and Preventive Health.

The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of aging and zinc status on microbial populations and the factors involved in the inflammatory response. The study will also define the role of the microbiota in age-related zinc loss and immune dysregulation.

Co-Investigators include Kathy Magnusson, Associate Professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences; Thomas Sharpton, Assistant Professor in the Department of Microbiology; and Natalia Shulzhenko, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences.

 

Peptidomics of In Vivo Digested Human Milk Proteins to Reveal Novel Immunomodulatory and Antimicrobial Peptides within the Infant Intestine

Funded by the Agricultural and Food Research Initiative’s Foundational Program from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture; $500,000 for three years.

Led by PI David Dallas, Assistant Professor in the School of Biological and Population Health Sciences.

The overall objectives of the study are to identify which peptides are released from milk proteins in the infant intestinal tract and determine their functions. This research will identify safe bioactive compounds which can be synthesized or possibly extracted from animal milk to be used to improve immune and gut health in infants, children and adults.

 

Impact of Innovative Health Care Policies on Abortion Access for Oregon Women Enrolled in Medicaid

Funded by the Society of Family Planning Research; $120,000 for two years.

Led by PI Marie Harvey, Associate Dean for Research and OSU Distinguished Professor of Public Health.

This investigation examines the impact of Medicaid reform in Oregon on abortion access and utilization. More specifically, the study will describe Oregon abortion rates among women of reproductive age enrolled in Medicaid and compare abortion access and utilization before and after the implementation of Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act.

 

An Oregon Poverty Measure: A Proposal to Create a More Accurate Measure of Poverty in Oregon

Funded by the Ford Family Foundation of Roseburg, Oregon, and Providence Health & Services of Seattle, Washington; $200,000 for two years.

Led by PI David Rothwell, Assistant Professor in the School of Social and Behavioral Health Sciences.

This project will develop a new measure to describe the Oregon population who are poor, identify where they live, and determine which policies and programs of tax credits, income transfers, and other subsidies can best help lift them out of poverty. The study will address current limitations in the Official Poverty Measure by using a combination of survey data to establish a more valid measure of poverty in the state.

 

Examining the Relationship Between the Quality of School-Based Recess and Social-Emotional Development in Children

Funded by Playworks Education Energized; $124,478 for 18-months.

Led by PI William Massey, Assistant Professor in the School of Biological and Population Health Sciences.

This cross-sectional study will explore how the quality and amount of recess impacts various markers of children’s social and emotional development. Specifically, the study will test the hypothesis that a high-quality recess is associated with higher levels of regulatory skills, health status, and academic outcomes.

 

Determining Limitations in Premature Infant Protein Digestion Capacity via Digestomic Analysis

Funded by The Gerber Foundation; $350,000 for three years.

Led by PI David Dallas, Assistant Professor in the School of Biological and Population Health Sciences.

The goal of this study is to identify the optimal protein nourishment for premature infants. The central hypothesis is that the developmental immaturity of the premature infant gut leads to lower proteolytic activity and, thus, a lower capacity to digest breast milk.