Faculty

HDFS Doctoral Degree Program

HDFS faculty are national leaders focused on interdisciplinary research and teaching across four signature areas:

  • Transitions Across the Life Course
  • Resilience and Health Across the Lifespan
  • Families in Sociocultural Contexts
  • Policies and Applications of Developmental and Family Science

 

 To contact faculty please go to their college profile pages, linked from their names.

Carolyn Aldwin, Ph.D.
Professor
Center for Healthy Aging Jo Anne Leonard Endowed Director

Currently accepting graduate students

Carolyn's research examines how psychosocial factors affect health, especially how individuals cope with stress. She also examines how personality, mental health, and physical health change across the lifespan. She is particularly interested in factors which affect the rate of aging, as well as stress-related growth.

Marc Braverman, Ph.D.
Professor
Extension Family and Community Health Program

Currently accepting graduate students

Marc's research examines adolescent health; health promotion theory and health interventions; smoking prevention and control; tobacco policy; program evaluation design and analysis; and design and delivery of community programs.

Kelly Chandler, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor


Kelly applies a work-family justice lens to study how working conditions, workplace culture, and work-family policies affect the health and daily lives of employees and their families. She also examines the implications of work for family processes, including emotional transmission, family routines, and parental socialization.

John Geldhof, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
HDFS Doctoral Program Director

Currently accepting graduate students

John's research focuses on the development of self-regulation across the lifespan and the relationship between intentional self-regulation and positive developmental outcomes (especially Positive Youth Development). He is also interested in quantitative methodology, both as a research domain and as a tool for optimizing his empirical research. As a substantive topic, his quantitative research focuses on latent variable and multilevel modeling techniques. He is also interested in the analysis of intensive repeated measures data.

Bridget Hatfield, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Currently accepting graduate students

Bridget is interested in teacher- and parent-child relationships in early childhood, children’s stress and school readiness skills, quality of early childhood education, teacher professional development, & implications for policy.

Karen Hooker, Ph.D.
Professor
Jo Anne Leonard Petersen Endowed Chair in Gerontology and Family Studies


Karen's research interests are on self and personality processes in understanding risk and resilience factors for optimal aging. This includes understanding the role of intergenerational relationships in fostering healthy attitudes towards aging.

Brianne Kothari, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
OSU-Cascades

Currently accepting graduate students

Brianne's research focuses on understanding the experiences and trajectories of at-risk populations as well as on designing, implementing and evaluating developmentally appropriate, family systems focused interventions.

Shannon Lipscomb, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
OSU-Cascades

Currently accepting graduate students

Shannon’s research identifies ways to promote resilience among young children, families, and early childhood teachers and providers.

Katherine (Kate) MacTavish, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
HDFS Undergraduate Program Director

Currently accepting graduate students

Kate's research focuses on rural families and communities, community effects, family management strategies & child/youth development in risky rural contexts, rural housing, rural schools, poverty & community development.

Megan McClelland, Ph.D.
Professor
Katherine E. Smith Healthy Children and Families Professor, Hallie Ford Director for the Center for Healthy Children and Families

Currently accepting graduate students

Dr. McClelland’s research is broadly focused on optimizing children's development, especially as it relates to social and cognitive development and school success. In general, she is interested in the importance of children's self-regulation, executive function, and social competence for success in preschool, elementary school, and throughout the life-span. Her recent research has focused on developing measures of self-regulation and interventions to promote school readiness and success.

Megan Pratt, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor (Practice)

Currently accepting graduate students

Megan's work focuses on understanding early learning at local, state, and national levels, with an emphasis on vulnerable populations. She investigates child care and early learning from the perspectives of the child, family, and workforce. Her work also examines how early learning in both formal (eg child care) and informal, community settings (eg libraries) can best support families with young children.

David Rothwell, MSW, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Barbara E. Knudson Endowed Chair in Family Policy

Currently accepting graduate students

David studies how the lives of children and families are affected by poverty and economic inequality. Current research focuses on understanding variations in poverty and family policy in rural America, Oregon, and across countries.

Richard A. Settersten, Jr., Ph.D.
University Distinguished Professor
Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs


Rick's research focuses on life course; age and aging; transitions; social relationships; historical experiences and social change; parenthood and family life; social policy.

Robert Stawski, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Currently accepting graduate students

Dr. Stawski’s research focuses on everyday stress and its proximal and cumulative impacts on health and wellbeing, cognitive aging, cognitive epidemiology, midlife development, and aging. He is also interested in quantitative methods, with particular foci on the application and analysis of data utilizing intensive repeated measures designs (e.g., daily diary, ecological momentary assessment, and measurement burst)

Shauna Tominey, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Practice & Parenting Education Specialist

Currently accepting graduate students

Shauna's research focuses broadly on supporting positive social and emotional outcomes for children and families. She has two related streams of translational research: 1) developing, implementing, and testing programs that promote self-regulation and emotional intelligence for children and the adults in their lives and 2) increasing access to parenting education to provide families with the information and support they need to be the parents they want to be.