Assistant professor’s paper selected as editor’s choice

Assistant Professor Jay Kim’s recent paper, published in the latest issue of Annals of Work Exposures and Health, has been selected as the editor’s choice. “A randomized controlled trial of a truck seat intervention: Part 2 – Associations between whole-body vibration exposures and health outcomes” represents the first randomized controlled trial that showed that reducing whole-body vibration exposure improved low back pain and other musculoskeletal health outcomes among professional truck drivers. Read full post. (November 5, 2018)

 

Jay Kim and Jaejin Hwang (NIU) received research funding from UIC's NIOSH ERC center.  ($25,000)

This study will evaluate muscle activity and joint net torque in hand, shoulder, and low back during patient transfer using four different engineering controls: a conventional cotton draw sheet, friction-reducing slide sheet, friction-reducing slide board, and air-assisted transfer device. (January 2018)

 

Jay Kim and Jaejin Hwang (NIU) received research funding from Office Ergonomics Research Committee. ($28,000)

This study will evaluate biomechanical exposures in the neck and upper extremities during augmented reality interactions to provide industry and users design recommendations and hand gesture usage guidelines. (January 2018)

 

Kiana Kia received prestigious  HFES Student Author Presentation Support Award (SAPSA) at the 2017 HFES annual meeting .

Kiana presented her recent work that evaluated biomechanical exposures and usability among ultra-low key travel keyboards. (October 2017)

 

Rock ‘n’ Roll: Jay Kim aims to improve health for drivers and equipment operators

About 75 percent of workers who operate heavy machinery in these fields suffer from muscle and joint pain. In 2016, Kim and collaborators at the University of Washington and Northeastern University reported that low-back pain was the most prevalent of all the possible musculoskeletal ailments experienced by these drivers. Read full story. (August 3, 2017)

 

Jay Kim received research funding from Alpha Foundation. ($148,270)

This grant titled "Evaluating the Effects of Multi-axial Whole Body Vibration Exposure on Postural Stability in Mining Equipment Vehicle Operators" is to determine whether the effects of mining vehicle's WBV exposures on postural balance and fall-relate injury risks are different between vertical-dominant and multi-axial WBV exposures. (August 1, 2017)

 

Jay Kim received research funding from Alpha Foundation. ($150,000)

This grant titled "Effects of Whole Body Vibration Exposure on Physiological Stresses in Mining Heavy Equipment Vehicle Operators" is to quantify physiological stresses associated with WBV exposures using biological markers.  This is the first study based on human model biomarker study to delineate underlying injury mechanisms associated with WBV exposures. (August 1, 2017)

 

Jay Kim received research funding from Alpha Foundation. ($361,407)

This grant titled “Systematic Evaluation of Multi-axial Suspension to Reduce Whole Body Vibration Exposures in Heavy Equipment Mining Vehicle Operators” will determine the efficacy of different engineering controls (mining vehicle seat suspensions) in reducing the multi-axial WBV exposures in mining vehicles and the associated biomechanical loading on the musculoskeletal system.  (January 1, 2017)

 

Jay Kim received research funding from Bose Corporation. ($37,800)

This study will evaluate the effects of Whole Body Vibration on Non-driving Activity Performance in autonomous vehicle environment. (March 2017)

 

Jay Kim received research funding from InsightNow Inc. ($37,000)

This study will evaluate biomechanical exposures and usability of various nasal sprays. (January 2017)

 

Jay Kim received research funding from Office Ergonomics Research Committee. ($25,000)

This study will evaluate biomechanical exposures and usability on ultra-low travel keyboards to determine whether ultra-low travel keyboards will alter computer-related musculoskeletal injury risks and performance measures as compared to conventional computer keyboards. (January 2016)

 

Uncovering clues to alleviate bodily stress from heavy equipment vehicles

Jay and his team are looking to change that and have been using biomarkers in the blood – inflammatory responses and other stress indicators – to look at the exact relationships between the vibration and the physiological response from our bodies. This will make it possible to delineate the injury mechanism from WBV and low back pain and other musculoskeletal disorders.  Read full story. (Synergies on Septeber 18, 2017)

 

Rock ‘n’ Roll: Jay Kim aims to improve health for drivers and equipment operators

One of the main objectives of Kim’s study is to provide physiological evidence that can explain the association between whole-body-vibration exposure and musculoskeletal disorders, especially in the neck and low-back regions. His goal is to contribute to improved engineering interventions (such as seating and machinery design) and better occupational health and well-being for workers.  Read full story. (Terra Magazine on August 3, 2017 )

 

Researchers to study physical, mental stress of operating heavy equipment

“There is a critical need to determine the exact injury mechanisms related to WBV exposure,” Jay says. “Without a clear understanding of how these mechanisms cause the development of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and how they may be mitigated, these workers will continue to suffer injury.”  Read full story. (Synergies on July 14, 2016)

Typing on a Tablet Can Put a Strain on Your Shoulders

Using touch-screen keyboards on tablet computers for long periods of time could lead to strain in the shoulders, suggests a study in the November issue of Applied Ergonomics that compared the musculoskeletal impact of three types of keyboards.

Read full story (The Wall Street Journal)

 

Find the Best Phone-Screen Size for You

Big screens are also better because, when it comes to touch screens, we all have fat fingers. Jay Kim and others studying tablets have found a correlation between typing speed and size of virtual keys.

Read full story (The Wall Street Journal)

 

Buckle Up: Test Driving Comfort Technology of Vehicle Seats

Have you ever taken that long car ride where you just can’t wait to get out? You say something along the lines of, “Ah my back is killing me” as you reach for the sky and hear every joint SNAP and POP. You know exactly what I am talking about, and so does Northern Illinois University professor Jay Kim.

Listen to or read full story (Northern Public Radio)