Center for Global Health

Making small changes in the big world and big changes in small worlds.

A mission without borders

The Center for Global Health is a community of learning and service that brings together Oregon State and partners around the world to address current and future global health challenges.

 

Partnerships rooted in purpose

Because health doesn’t recognize borders, we draw on connections within Oregon State University and across the globe to transform health and well-being in communities from ethiopia to bangladesh.

Out of a sense of deep responsibility and a belief that we are part of a global community, faculty and students facilitate leading research, support community initiated health development programs and projects, and provide education and training programs in collaboration with partner communities.

Our diverse work has a common theme: Community ownership of equitable and sustainable health development.

 

Health is a human right

Every person, family and community deserves fundamental claims of human dignity and self-determination. Our approach is rooted in this responsibility to our global community, and our work is grounded in these principles.

We strive to create visible and positive change by working with our partners — non-government organizations (NGOs), community-based organizations, academic institutions, government agencies, international organizations and UN agencies.

By working together, we commit to making big changes in targeted communities such as the Southern Thyolo District and Balaka District of Malawi, Debre Berhan and Gonder of Ethiopia, and Balan and Fonds Cheval in Haiti.

 

Current focus areas include

  • Health systems strengthening and governance
  • Political economy of refugees and displacement
  • Comprehensive community development in low-income nations
  • Environment, hygiene and water
  • Equity in health care and financial burden of health care
  • Methods for community decision making in health development
  • Food security, sovereignty and community nutrition
  • Adolescent reproductive and sexual health
  • Mental health in low-income nations
  • Community health workers and task shifting
  • Women’s health, gender inequity and gender-based violence