Press Contacts

Michelle Klampe
News & Research Communications
Oregon State University
541- 737-0784
Staff Profile

Rick Settersten
Hallie E. Ford Endowed Chair
College of Public Health and Human Sciences
Oregon State University
541-737-8902
Faculty Profile

June 2014

The College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University is now recognized among other elite schools in the nation, and becomes the first in the state of Oregon to be honored by the Council on Education for Public Health.

April 2014

An article in U.S. News & World Report highlights the recent findings in the relationship between motor skill deficiencies and the severity of autism symptoms in very young children. Assistant Professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences and Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families, Megan MacDonald, notes that the lag in motor skills development among children with autism was not linked to intellectual ability.

Assistant Professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences and Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families, Megan MacDonald, has found a relationship between motor skill deficiencies and the severity of the symptoms of autism spectrum disorder in very young children. "Recognizing these deficits really early gives us more time to help children catch up to their peers in regards to motor skills," said MacDonald, who is an expert on the movement of skills of children with autism.

It’s a misconception that rural kids are healthier than their urban counterparts, said College of Public Health and Human Sciences (CPHHS) and Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families Assistant Professor Deborah John, who co-directs the project with Associate Professor Kathy Gunter. “We’re finding that rural communities have fewer options for children and families to eat healthy and be physically active because residents often live far away from school, work, parks and grocery stores,” she said.

Health care satisfiaction, or the lack of, could influence health outcomes for patients, affect participation in health care programs under the new Affordable Care Act, and contribute to disparities in health care access for Latinos. Read more about this study co-authored by S. Marie Harvey, associate dean and professor of public health, and Jocelyn T. Warren, assistant research professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences and Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families.

March 2014

Mistrust of the medical community and perceived discrimination by health care providers can affect how satisfied young adult Latinos in rural Oregon are with their health care, new research from Oregon State University shows. Findings of the research were published recently in "The Journal of Rural Health." The article was co-authored by S. Marie Harvey, associate dean and professor of public health, and Jocelyn T. Warren, assistant research professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences and Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families.

February 2014

There's no argument that today’s youth are our future. But how do we ensure Oregon youth are headed down the right path – a path that leads to healthy living, success and advancement? PHHS Professor and Extension 4-H Youth Development Specialist Mary Arnold is working to find those answers. And she's doing so through a newly appointed position by Oregon Gov. Kitzhaber, serving as a member of the Oregon Youth Development Council.

Some studies indicate that how well children perform certain skills at age 5 or 6 is a better predictor than early reading or math skills of which students will be strong readers by grade three--and even which students will graduate from college. And research shows those skills can be taught, according to Megan McClelland, an associate professor at OSU's Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families.

January 2014

Gloria Krahn, the Barbara Emily Knudson Chair in Family Policy, joins OSU's College of Public Health and Human Sciences after spending five years with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and before that 25 years at Oregon Health & Science University. At CPHHS she'll bring her many rich experiences to bear through leadership, natural curiousity and a lifelong commitment to health.

November 2013

The story that followed cited research by Shannon Lipscomb, Assistant Professor at Oregon State University and the Hallie E. Ford Center. Lipscomb was the lead author of an article titled “Genetic vulnerability interacts with parenting and early care and education to predict increasing externalizing behavior” that was published in the Oct. 23 edition of the International Journal of Behavioral Development.

Now, you might be wondering: Shouldn’t it be the patient’s job to notify ex-partners? ”People don’t necessarily do that,” says Jocelyn Warren, a public health researcher with the Hallie Ford Center at Oregon State University. Studies show that couples — especially young couples — don’t communicate about their sexual histories. (Surprise, surprise!) And telling an ex about an STD infection can be especially “difficult,” Warren says.

The Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families is being recognized as an outstanding example of compatible infill development within a historic district. “Hallie Ford wanted to inspire people to use the resources they have to make the world a better place,” said Richard Settersten, Hallie E. Ford endowed director. “This principle not only drives the work we do, but is also reflected in the intentional design and beauty of the building we now call home.”

Oregon State University graduate student at the Hallie E. Ford Center, Bethany Harmon, is in the spotlight for her healthy Beaver Fan Blackbean Quinoa Salad recipe that won the People's Choice Award at the College of Public Health and Human Sciences GridIron Chef Contest.

October 2013

Oregon State University and the Oregon Health Authority have received a $1.25 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control to evaluate how the health of low-income women and their infants is affected when more are eligible for Medicaid health care coverage on the Oregon Health Plan. “Oregon is an ideal state to conduct this study because of its ongoing commitment to Medicaid health care delivery for all and the commitment of state leaders to collaborate to ensure this program’s success,” said Marie Harvey, associate dean of research in OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences and the Hallie Ford Center.

Oregon State University and the Oregon Health Authority have received $1.25 million from the Centers for Disease Control to study the health impact of opening the Oregon Health Plan to more people. The five-year study will evaluate how the health of low-income women and their infants is affected when more of them are eligible for Medicaid health care coverage, i.e., the Oregon Health Plan. The OSU team will be led by researchers in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences and Hallie Ford Center, including Marie Harvey, Jeff Luck, Jocelyn Warren and Jangho Yoon.

The notion that the human aging process can to some degree be managed or controlled underlies one of the most vibrant intellectual traditions in gerontology: successful aging. Rick Settersten, Endowed Director of the Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families analyzes data from interviews with anti-aging practitioners to evaluate how their descriptions of the work they do, their definitions of aging, and their goals for their patients intersect with gerontological views of “successful aging.”

Despite ample research on behavioral aspects of the transition to adulthood, few comparative studies have focused on “subjective” facets. Using data from the European Social Survey, Rick Settersten, Endowed Director of the Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families probes similarities and differences in conceptions of adulthood for men and women in twenty-five European countries. 

When tweaked, the classic preschool game Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes can help predict a child's academic ability in school—and perhaps success in life, Megan McClelland says, a professor at Oregon State University and Core Director of the Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families.

Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders often face greater challenges finding the best learning therapies for their child. A new study by researcher, Megan MacDonald at Oregon State University and the Hallie Ford Center, looks at children with autism who have better fine motor skills and if having those skills improves learning development.

A large body of scientific evidence in the United States is shouting. Its message is clear but politically and socially charged: We need to pay more attention to men. Rick Settersten, Endowed Director of the Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families talks about how our current society needs to focus more on the men of today and encourage men to "be more like women in their ambitions, achievements, choices, and work styles, and to actively design social policies to move men's lives in that direction."

September 2013

Autistic toddlers and preschoolers with better motor abilities also have a higher level of communication and social skills, says Oregon State University and Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families researcher, Megan MacDonald. This study was published in the journal of "Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders."

August 2013

The Albany Democrat Herald's latest resource guide for parents highlights the expertise of several of the Hallie Ford staff.  Megan MacDonald gives suggestions for adaptive activities for children with special needs as well as insight on how to cope with autism (pages 6-7). Denise Rennekamp comments on ways to be a positive influence on your children (page 9), and Kathy Gunter points out the importance of a healthy diet and proper exercise (page 19).

Megan McClelland, an associate professor at OSU’s Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families, has long been fascinated with the idea of how children’s ability to “self-regulate” can help predict long-term success in school. Oregon children starting kindergarten this fall will be assessed to determine their readiness to learn--a statewide effort that's been built in part on research by Dr. McClelland.

There's also a crucial social context for tween tantrums, according to Denise Rennekamp, parenting education coordinator and outreach coordinator at Oregon State University's Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families. Rennekamp said by email that tweens have a deep thirst for independence, control and privacy.

As an expert in nutrition and exercise science, Melinda Manore, an Oregon State University professor who is co-leading The WAVE~Ripples for Change: Obesity Prevention for Active Youth in Afterschool Programs housed at the Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families, is always fascinated by the latest research on eating habits and body weight.

July 2013

OSU researcher Melinda Manore, who is involved with The WAVE~Ripples for Change: Obesity Prevention for Active Youth in Afterschool Programs Using Virtual-and-Real-World Experiential Learning housed at the Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families, advises about the best kinds of foods to eat when serotonin levels are low and the body is craving not-so-healthy foods.

Now that the graduation ceremonies and celebrations are over, Barbara Schneider and Richard Settersten, Endowed Director of the Hallie E. Ford Center at Oregon State University, turn to the question on the minds of graduates and their parents: What comes next?

OSU researcher Melinda Manore, who is involved with The WAVE~Ripples for Change: Obesity Prevention for Active Youth in Afterschool Programs Using Virtual-and-Real-World Experiential Learning housed at the Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families, looks at the benefits of teaching athletes how to consume what she calls a low-energy-dense diet to avoid eating that is unhealthy and unsustainable while involved with a sport.

June 2013

Students in Kathy Gunter’s EXSS 435 Physical Activity Promotion class learned about the importance of supporting parents and teachers in efforts to increase children’s physical activity levels.  Watch a short video designed to help keep kids active at home and at school.  The video was produced by students Bryan Crocker, Emily VanMeter, and Sophia Parker.

We would like to introduce Kathy Gunter, Assistant Professor of Exercise and Sport Science and Extension Specialist. Kathy has just been appointed Director of the Healthy Lifestyles and Obesity Prevention Core at HFC.

Wanless and Megan McClelland, an associate professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University and Core Director of the Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families, along with co-authors at U.S. and Asian universities, conducted assessments of 814 children in the United States, China, South Korea and Taiwan.

May 2013

Researchers and partners from the College of Public Health and Human Sciences, College of Engineering, Extension and Media Services hosted the event to promote the nearly $5 million USDA grant they received to develop an obesity prevention and healthy life style program for teenagers. The project is directed by Assistant Professor Siew Sun Wong and is housed in the Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families.

A new study, conducted by Shannon Wanless, shows there is a gender gap when it comes to behavior and self-control in American young children--one that does not appear to exist in children in Asia.  Wanless began conducting the research during her doctoral studies at Oregon State University under Megan McClelland, an associate professor in OSU’s Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families.

On behalf of the Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families at Oregon State University and the Oregon Parenting Education Collaborative, we are pleased to announce that Oregon Parenting Education Week  was observed May 19-25, 2013.  Click here to view the 2013 Oregon Parenting Education Week presentations.

Of all the things that influence a child’s growth and development, the most critical is reliable, responsive, and sensitive parenting. Effective parenting education programs have been linked with decreased rates of child abuse and neglect, better physical, cognitive and emotional development in children, and increased parental knowledge of child development and parenting skills.

April 2013

Researchers housed in the Hallie E. Ford Center, Assistant Professor Deborah John and graduate student Alinna Ghavami, were honored for employing a community-based and participatory research approach to study the interplay between healthy aging options in communities across Clackamas County.

Nutrition specialists say the real challenge is getting teens to make the necessary lifestyle changes as they become young adults. ”If they do go to the fast food restaurant how do they make better choices even if other people aren’t,” says Melinda Manore,  a Professor of Nutrition at OSU.

November 2012

Preventing house fires is important, especially in families with children – but there is growing evidence that flame retardant materials used broadly in furniture, electronics, and even toys, may create a new health threat.

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Children living in rural areas are at a 20 to 50 percent higher risk of being overweight or obese, and researchers at the Oregon State University Extension Service are about to launch a three-year program to find out why and figure out ways to change it.

 

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October 2012

Researchers believe that if more adults — teachers, mentors and parents — would address the topic of STDs instead of shying away from it, young folks would listen and potentially be armed with the information they need to make better decisions when it comes to sex.

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Personalized genomic medicine is hailed as a revolution that will empower patients to take control of their own health care, but it could end up taking control away from patients and limiting their treatment choices, concludes an article in the Hastings Center Report.

Estacada will become one of several testing grounds over the next three years as the Oregon State University Extension Service works to de-code how local communities influence child health and wellness.

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September 2012

Oregon State University researchers now say that organizations may have been going the wrong way about preventing risky sexual behavior among teens.

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New research out of Oregon State University is challenging how strongly preschools should focus on reading, writing, and arithmetic.

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Students who start kindergarten equipped with certain skills and knowledge are far more likely to be strong readers in grade three and beyond. Key traits include basic counting skills, the ability to follow directions and take turns, and familiarity with letter sounds and simple words.

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August 2012

Parents who want to stimulate their children’s brain development often focus on things like early reading, flashcards and language tapes. But a growing body of research suggests that playing certain kinds of childhood games may be the best way to increase a child’s ability to do well in school.

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Young children who are able to pay attention and persist with a task have a 50 percent greater chance of completing college, according to a new study at Oregon State University.

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July 2012

The article tests hypotheses using two-level linear regression models with individuals aged 18–35 years in 23 European countries. Our results reveal opposing trends at the individual and country levels. Young adults with greater personal security are more likely to plan than those who have fewer personal resources. Yet, young adults who live in countries with less favourable societal conditions are actually more likely to plan than those who live in countries with more favourable conditions. We conclude with explanations for, and the implications of, these opposing tendencies.

Before we start lots of handwringing about parents and children today, let’s get a grip: If the 20th century American family were displayed in an animated flipbook, the first pages whizzing by would show large families with many children clustered on the margins, evolving to the present with just a few children situated at the center.

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June 2012

This weekend, members of the college class of 2012 in Oregon will throw their caps in the air in that springtime middle-class ritual. But there are some dirty secrets about college-going and college debt that Oregon families need to know, especially in the wake of recent announcements about rising tuition in our state.

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While many studies in the past decade have shown that a father's involvement can improve a child's well-being, newer research finds that becoming a father affects the men, too. New fathers exhibit hormonal changes and, in turn, alter their behavior, which suggests that having children influences men in far-reaching ways.

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Comcast Newsmakers of Oregon and Southwest Washington is hosted by veteran journalist Ken Ackerman. It features informational discussions with local, state and federal elected officials as well as community, non-profit, education and civic leaders. It is a great way for residents in the community to find out about the people and issues that directly affect their lives.

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May 2012

National problems of childhood obesity and school readiness – and how effective parenting can play a role in overcoming these issues – is lending new urgency this year in Oregon to Oregon Parenting Education Week, which took place May 20-26, 2012.

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February 2012

Researchers have found that parents who anger easily and over-react are more likely to have toddlers who act out and become upset easily.

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More stories from the Center...

  • Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families Grand Opening
    On September 8, more than 150 friends and campus representatives gathered to celebrate the grand opening of the Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families at Oregon State University. The center was made possible by the visionary gift of the late Oregon philanthropist, Hallie Ford.
  • Building collaboration: Hallie Ford Center aims to bring together research, practitioners
    Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families aims to bring together research, practitioners. Rick Settersten walks through the interior of the new Hallie Ford Center, and he sees more than just builders working around glass and wood. He sees workers building spaces for collaboration that could help children and families throughout Oregon — and beyond — make healthier choices.
  • First endowed director named for Hallie Ford Center
    Rick Settersten, a professor of human development and family sciences at Oregon State University, has been named the first endowed director of OSU’s Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families.