Botswana Global Learning Internship Program

June 25-August 2, 2020

“Hands on” global learning, cross-cultural training, and community-based work opportunities.

 

  Undergraduate or graduate. Students from all majors/colleges welcome.

Supported by the Robert & Sara Rothschild Endowment Fund, the Botswana Global Learning Internship Program is a collaborative effort by Oregon State University’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences, the College of Nursing, University of Michigan (UM), and the Ministry of Health and Wellness in Botswana to offer students “hands on” global learning, cross-cultural training, and community-based work opportunities.

The program is designed to target students from diverse academic backgrounds and interests, including public health, nursing, agricultural sciences, engineering, environmental sciences, social sciences, etc. Student interns work as part of a team of interns and professors on projects related to understanding local cultural practices and beliefs, impact of infrastructure on everyday life and health, education and health infrastructure and services, community food and nutrition, in-clinic and outreach services provided by the local community clinic and health outposts, and related topics.

If you're an undergraduate or graduate student studying public health, agriculture, forestry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, engineering or social sciences, and have a passion for community-based work, you're a great fit.

Be sure to read Eyes wide open: Botswana global health program creates a new worldview.

Program Reports

This report summarizes the findings of the work that the Botswana Global Health Internship Program team carried out in June-August 2019 in Maunatlala, Botswana. We worked in collaboration with key stakeholders of the Maunatlala community, the Ministry of Health and Wellness, and the Ministry of Youth Empowerment, Sport, and Culture Development, Republic of Botswana. This report has benefitted from suggestions from our community partners, staff at the Maunatlala Clinic, Maunatlala Community Library, Masupe Primary School, and Maunatlala Junior School. The report also includes suggestions from members of the Ministry of Health and Wellness and the Ministry of Youth Empowerment, Sport, and Culture Development. We sincerely thank all our collaborators for their work and support.

This report summarizes the findings of the work that the Botswana Global Health Internship Program team carried in July 2018 in Maunatlala, Botswana. We worked in collaboration with key stakeholders of the Maunatlala community and the Ministry of Health and Wellness, Republic of Botswana. The report has benefited from insightful suggestions from the staff at the Maunatlala Community Library, Maunatlala Clinic, Masupe Primary School, and Maunatlala Junior School. We also list here the key recommendations that we made after completing a pilot work in 2017 in Maunatlala. In addition, we provide a brief summary of the impact of our initial work in the village.

After traveling to Botswana to conduct public health fieldwork, Victoria Adams changed her major, joined a sorority, and gained an immeasurable amount of confidence.

Experiential learning challenges and inspires OSU students to tackle problems facing our state and the world. Generous donors make many of these experiences possible.

“My time in Botswana helped me understand a whole new worldview,” says MPH student Lauren Welch. “It changed me in ways I didn’t know I could change. I went into the experience expecting to come away with a greater understanding of health on a global scale, but I ended up returning with a million more questions.”

Info

Detailed info about the program is available in Botswana Global Health Internship Program (pdf)

Tentative Program Dates

June 25-August 2, 2020

Location

Maunatlala, Botswana

Application

Application deadline: March 1, 2020

Apply through Botswana Global Health Internship Program at OSU GO.

Contact

For more information contact:

Sunil.Khanna@oregonstate.edu
541-737-6405

Challenging the Status Quo in Global Health: Lessons from Reciprocal Community Engagement in Botswana

This presentation explores the processes of engaging communities throughout the research process – from conceptualization of the problem/issues to implementation and evaluation. Sunil Khanna shares lessons that he has learned while conducting long-term community participatory research in a rural community in Botswana since 2017.

Understanding community priorities and engaging community stakeholders involves constant negotiations between the researcher and the community. It is a “balancing act” of three sets of expectations - those of the community, the researcher, and the funding agency.

Khanna discusses how the complexity of achieving balance between the ideals and the reality of community participatory research can be realized using a reciprocal community engagement approach, especially in the context of global health.