Pain attitudes and pain outcomes among people with bleeding disorders: Results from community voices in research

2024  Journal Article

Pain attitudes and pain outcomes among people with bleeding disorders: Results from community voices in research

Pub TLDR

The article focuses on the relationship between pain attitudes and pain outcomes among people with bleeding disorders (PwBD). Pain is a significant issue for PwBD, and current pain treatments are often ineffective. However, there is limited understanding of the psychological factors involved in pain processing for this population.

The findings suggest that modification of pain attitudes presents a possible avenue for interventions to improve pain outcomes and increase patient satisfaction with pain management.

DOI: 10.1111/hae.14942    PubMed ID: 38415392
 

College of Health researcher(s)

Abstract

Introduction

Among people with bleeding disorders (PwBD), pain is a major problem and pain treatments are often ineffective. Understanding of psychological factors involved in pain processing is limited. Maladaptive pain attitudes are associated with worse pain outcomes and adaptive pain attitudes are associated with better outcomes in high pain conditions, but relationships between pain attitudes and pain outcomes are so far unexplored among PwBD.

Aim

To investigate relationships between pain attitudes and pain outcomes among PwBD.

Methods

Pain attitudes were measured with the Survey of Pain Attitudes, containing two adaptive scales (Control and Emotion) and five maladaptive scales (Disability, Harm, Medication, Solicitude, Medical Cure). Adults with bleeding disorders, who had pain, and were enrolled in Community Voices in Research were eligible. Participants (n = 72) completed an online survey. Cross sectional associations between pain attitudes and pain outcomes (pain and prescribed pain medication use) were investigated using logistic regression.

Results

After adjustment for covariates, greater Control attitudes were associated with lower odds of more severe pain, and greater Disability, Harm, and Medication attitudes were all associated with higher odds of more severe pain and with higher odds of any prescribed pain medication use and opioid pain medication use.

Conclusions

We presented compelling evidence of relationships between pain attitudes and pain outcomes in PwBD, though corroboration is needed from other populations. Our findings suggest that modification of pain attitudes presents a possible avenue for interventions to improve pain outcomes and increase patient satisfaction with pain management.

Pierce, C., Branscum, A., Irvin, V.L., Elander, J., Bovbjerg, M.L., Witkop, M.L., Smit, E.(2024)Pain attitudes and pain outcomes among people with bleeding disorders: Results from community voices in researchHaemophilia