People

People

Family, Work, & Well-Being Lab

Lab director

Kelly D. Chandler, PhD

Kelly D. Chandler, PhD

Associate Professor, Human Development & Family Sciences

Faculty profile

Kelly applies a work-family justice lens to understand the diversity of lived experiences of adults at work, at home, and in their work-family integration. She studies how job conditions, workplace culture, and work-family policies affect the health and well-being of employees and their families. She also studies daily stress and emotional transmission in families.

Graduate students

Kara McElvaine

Kara McElvaine, MS

Student profile

As an emerging mixed method social scientist, Kara is grateful for the opportunity to be a part of a cutting edge research team using innovative methods to understand the intersection of families, work, and well-being. Through her work with Dr. Chandler and the Family, Work, & Well-Being Lab, Kara uses social justice-aligned research to support initiatives which restructure workplaces to be more supportive of the holistic well-being of workers and their family members. She is also interested in deeply understanding connections between micro-level processes (e.g., socialization) and macro-level structural forces (e.g., policies), both of which have very real effects on human development throughout the life course.

Madeline J. Nichols, MS

Madeline J. Nichols, MS

 Student profile

Madeline is a current graduate student in the Human Development and Family Sciences program at Oregon State University. Her research focuses on how adults in mid- and later-life understand, process, and regulate their emotions in different interpersonal contexts.

Jess Brown-Hamlett

Jezz Brown-Hamlett

 Student profile

Jezz is passionate about studying families through critical epistemologies, especially intersectional frameworks. Their research focuses on family theorizing, the work-family interface and the experiences of student-parents, particularly those with young children. She is also interested in family/academic policy, birth and reproductive justice, emerging adulthood, and the application of feminist methodologies.

Christopher Lombardo

Christopher Lombardo

Student profile

Chris is a PhD student in HDFS. His research broadly focuses on family poverty, differential mobility (one family member moving up or down socioeconomic classes), and how environmental risk affects development and resilience. He is especially interested in marginalized families and communities.

Former students

Corine Tyler

Corine Tyler, PhD

Corine's research focused on how individuals understand and engage with oppressive contexts. She was also interested in exploring how contexts could be altered in order to promote social justice and support individual well-being. As a part of the Family, Work, & Well-Being Lab, Corine worked on projects related to how family characteristics and processes might inform youth's critical consciousness and the various ways in which they coped with oppression. Corine valued the lab's diverse methodological approaches to research and the emphasis that the lab put on conducting research that had a direct application to individuals' lives.