Requests and Resources

The Kindergarten Readiness Research Program

We are passionate about disseminating our research to the community in order to help children, parents and teachers.

Requests

Request a Self-Regulation Training or Presentation

As a research lab, we are passionate about disseminating our research to the community in order to help children, parents and teachers. If you are interested in learning more about self-regulation, school readiness or how you can promote self-regulation skills in the classroom, please let us know by completing our online request form.

 

Request the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders (HTKS) Measure of Self-Regulation 

Visit Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders (HTKS) Measure of Self-Regulation if you are interested in learning more about the HTKS measure and how you may use it for your own research.

 

Resources

For additional resources on school readiness click here: School Readiness or for additional resources on self-regulation click here: Self-Regulation.

 

New Book

Teachers and parents of preschoolers have a new resource from Oregon State University professor Megan Stop, Think, Act: Integrating Self-regulation in the Early Childhood ClassroomMcClelland and OSU graduate Shauna Tominey, whose new book demonstrates how to help 3-to-6-year-olds flourish during their formative years.

The book offers early childhood education teachers the latest research, a wide variety of hands-on activities to help children learn and practice self-regulation techniques, as well as tips and tools for integrating those activities into early learning settings.

“Stop, Think, Act” is also useful for parents of children ages 3-6 who are looking for ways to help prepare their children for schools, said McClelland, a nationally-recognized expert in child development.

Read full story: New book from OSU expert shows teachers, parents how to help preschoolers thrive

 

Research Brief

The study examined the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders (HTKS) task—a five to seven-minute activity measuring behavioral self-regulation and executive function (EF)—as a predictor of academic achievement over the transition to formal schooling. Compared to other measures of individual aspects of EF, the HTKS task is a practical and efficient predictor of academic growth and school readiness in children transitioning from prekindergarten to kindergarten.

Read full brief: Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders Task: Predicting Academic Success in Early Childhood Education

View Infographic: Predicting Academic Success in Early Childhood Education