TitleWork stress and risk of cancer: meta-analysis of 5700 incident cancer events in 116,000 European men and women.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsHeikkilä, K, Nyberg, ST, Theorell, T, Fransson, EI, Alfredsson, L, Bjorner, JB, Bonenfant, S, Borritz, M, Bouillon, K, Burr, H, Dragano, N, Geuskens, GA, Goldberg, M, Hamer, M, Hooftman, WE, Houtman, IL, Joensuu, M, Knutsson, A, Koskenvuo, M, Koskinen, A, Kouvonen, A, Madsen, IEH, Hanson, LLMagnusso, Marmot, MG, Nielsen, ML, Nordin, M, Oksanen, T, Pentti, J, Salo, P, Rugulies, R, Steptoe, A, Suominen, S, Vahtera, J, Virtanen, M, Väänänen, A, Westerholm, P, Westerlund, H, Zins, M, Ferrie, JE, Singh-Manoux, A, Batty, GD, Kivimäki, M
Corporate AuthorsIPD-Work Consortium
JournalBMJ
Volume346
Paginationf165
Date Published2013 Feb 07
ISSN1756-1833
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Age Distribution, Aged, Alcohol Drinking, Body Mass Index, Breast Neoplasms, Colorectal Neoplasms, Europe, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Incidence, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Occupational Diseases, Prostatic Neoplasms, Risk Factors, Sex Distribution, Smoking, Socioeconomic Factors, Stress, Psychological, Young Adult
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether work related stress, measured and defined as job strain, is associated with the overall risk of cancer and the risk of colorectal, lung, breast, or prostate cancers.

DESIGN: Meta-analysis of pooled prospective individual participant data from 12 European cohort studies including 116,056 men and women aged 17-70 who were free from cancer at study baseline and were followed-up for a median of 12 years. Work stress was measured and defined as job strain, which was self reported at baseline. Incident cancers (all n=5765, colorectal cancer n=522, lung cancer n=374, breast cancer n=1010, prostate cancer n=865) were ascertained from cancer, hospital admission, and death registers. Data were analysed in each study with Cox regression and the study specific estimates pooled in meta-analyses. Models were adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic position, body mass index (BMI), smoking, and alcohol intake

RESULTS: A harmonised measure of work stress, high job strain, was not associated with overall risk of cancer (hazard ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.90 to 1.04) in the multivariable adjusted analyses. Similarly, no association was observed between job strain and the risk of colorectal (1.16, 0.90 to 1.48), lung (1.17, 0.88 to 1.54), breast (0.97, 0.82 to 1.14), or prostate (0.86, 0.68 to 1.09) cancers. There was no clear evidence for an association between the categories of job strain and the risk of cancer.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that work related stress, measured and defined as job strain, at baseline is unlikely to be an important risk factor for colorectal, lung, breast, or prostate cancers.

DOI10.1136/bmj.f165
Alternate JournalBMJ
PubMed ID23393080
PubMed Central IDPMC3567204
Grant List / / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom
G19/35 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0100222 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
/ / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G8802774 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0902037 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MR/K013351/1 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
/ / Wellcome Trust / United Kingdom
RG/07/008/23674 / / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom