TitlePhysical Education and Sport: Does Participation Relate to Physical Activity Patterns, Observed Fitness, and Personal Attitudes and Beliefs?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsLoprinzi, PD, Cardinal, BJ, Cardinal, MK, Corbin, CB
JournalAm J Health Promot
Volume32
Issue3
Pagination613-620
Date Published03/2018
ISSN2168-6602
Abstract
 

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between physical education (PE) and sports involvement with physical activity (PA), physical fitness, and beliefs about PA among a national sample of adolescents.

SETTING: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey National Youth Fitness Survey were used.

PARTICIPANTS: A total of 459 adolescents aged 12 to 15 years.

MEASURES: Adolescents self-reported engagement in the above parameters; muscular fitness objectively determined.

ANALYSIS: Multivariable linear regression.

RESULTS: Adolescents who had PE during school days had a higher enjoyment of participating in PE (β = 0.32; P = .01), engaged in more days of being physically active for ≥60 min/d (β = 1.02; P < .001), and performed the plank fitness test longer (β = 17.2; P = .002). Adolescents who played school sports reported that more PA was needed for good health (β = 0.23; P = .04), had a higher enjoyment of participating in PE (β = 0.31; P = .003), engaged in more days of being physically active for ≥60 min/d (β = 0.70; P = .01), performed more pull-ups (β = 2.33; P = .008), had a stronger grip strength (β = 2.5; P = .01), and performed the plank fitness test longer (β = 11.6; P = .04).

CONCLUSION: Adolescents who had PE during school, who had more frequent and long-lasting PE, and who played school sports generally had more accurate perceptions of the amount of PA needed for good health, had greater enjoyment of PE, were more physically active, and performed better on several muscular fitness-related tests. This underscores the importance of PE integration in the schools and encouragement of school sports participation.

DOI10.1177/0890117117698088
Alternate JournalAm J Health Promot
PubMed ID28318306