TitleParental Behavior Comparisons Between Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Parents of Children Without Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Meta-analysis
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsKu, B, Stinson, JDawn, Macdonald, M
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Date Published04/2019
ISSN1062-1024
Abstract
 

Objectives

Parental behavior plays an important role in child development. Given inconsistent findings in the literature related to parental behaviors or parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and those without, the purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis to examine whether parenting behavior differences existed between parents of children with and without ASD. In addition, this meta-analysis examined the moderation effect of child development (e.g., global and language development) and parental communication style (verbal only and verbal/non-verbal interactions combined) on the parental behavior differences between parents of children with and without ASD.

Methods

A systematic database and manual search identified 16 observational studies, which met predetermined inclusion criteria. Observable parental behaviors were categorized into four globally identifiable parental dimensions (parental warmth/support, parental behavioral control, parental negativity and neutral parental behavior) to capture the fundamental parental behaviors.

Results

There were no significant parental supportive/warmth and neutral behavior differences between the two groups. However, parents of children with ASD showed more controlling and negative behaviors compared to parents of children without ASD. The parental communication style was a significant moderator in the parental supportive/warmth dimension. Additionally, a child’s developmental ability was a significant moderator in the parental control dimension.

Conclusions

These parental behavior differences between parents of children with and without ASD should be considered when creating and developing family-related interventions for children with ASD.

DOI10.1007/s10826-019-01412-w
Short TitleJ Child Fam Stud