TitleAn observational study of retail availability and in-store marketing of e-cigarettes in London: potential to undermine recent tobacco control gains?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsHsu, R, Myers, AE, Ribisl, KM, Marteau, TM
JournalBMJ Open
Volume3
Issue12
Paginatione004085
Date Published12/2013
ISSN2044-6055
Abstract
 

OBJECTIVES: E-cigarette companies and vendors claim the potential of e-cigarettes to help smokers reduce or quit tobacco use. E-cigarettes also have the potential to renormalise smoking. The purpose of this study was to describe the availability and in-store marketing of e-cigarettes in London, UK stores selling tobacco and alcohol.

DESIGN: Observational study.

SETTING: Small and large stores selling alcohol and tobacco in London, UK.

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of stores selling e-cigarettes, the number of stores with an interior or exterior e-cigarette advertisement, the number of stores with an e-cigarette point-of-sale movable display, store size, deprivation index score for store's corresponding lower super output area.

RESULTS: Audits were completed in 108 of 128 selected stores. 62 of the audited stores (57%) sold e-cigarettes. E-cigarette availability was unrelated to store size. There was a statistically non-significant trend towards increased availability in more deprived areas (p=0.069). 31 of the 62 stores (50%) selling e-cigarettes had a point-of-sale movable display, with all but one found in small stores. Two small stores had interior advertisements and eight had exterior advertisements. No advertisements were observed in large stores.

CONCLUSIONS: This audit revealed widespread availability of e-cigarettes and in-store marketing in London, UK. Even if e-cigarettes prove to be an effective cessation aid, their sale and use are resulting in an increasing public presence of cigarette-like images and smoking behaviour. After decades of work to denormalise smoking, these findings raise the question of whether e-cigarettes are renormalising smoking.

DOI10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004085
Alternate JournalBMJ Open
PubMed ID24366581
PubMed Central IDPMC3884782