TitleJob strain and health-related lifestyle: findings from an individual-participant meta-analysis of 118,000 working adults.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsHeikkilä, K, Fransson, EI, Nyberg, ST, Zins, M, Westerlund, H, Westerholm, P, Virtanen, M, Vahtera, J, Suominen, S, Steptoe, A, Salo, P, Pentti, J, Oksanen, T, Nordin, M, Marmot, MG, Lunau, T, Ladwig, K-H, Koskenvuo, M, Knutsson, A, Kittel, F, Jöckel, K-H, Goldberg, M, Erbel, R, Dragano, N, DeBacquer, D, Clays, E, Casini, A, Alfredsson, L, Ferrie, JE, Singh-Manoux, A, Batty, GD, Kivimäki, M
Corporate AuthorsIPD-Work Consortium
JournalAm J Public Health
Volume103
Issue11
Pagination2090-7
Date Published2013 Nov
ISSN1541-0048
KeywordsAdult, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Europe, Female, Health Behavior, Humans, Life Style, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Occupational Diseases, Prospective Studies, Stress, Psychological
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examined the associations of job strain, an indicator of work-related stress, with overall unhealthy and healthy lifestyles.

METHODS: We conducted a meta-analysis of individual-level data from 11 European studies (cross-sectional data: n = 118,701; longitudinal data: n = 43,971). We analyzed job strain as a set of binary (job strain vs no job strain) and categorical (high job strain, active job, passive job, and low job strain) variables. Factors used to define healthy and unhealthy lifestyles were body mass index, smoking, alcohol intake, and leisure-time physical activity.

RESULTS: Individuals with job strain were more likely than those with no job strain to have 4 unhealthy lifestyle factors (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.12, 1.39) and less likely to have 4 healthy lifestyle factors (OR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.80, 0.99). The odds of adopting a healthy lifestyle during study follow-up were lower among individuals with high job strain than among those with low job strain (OR = 0.88; 95% CI = 0.81, 0.96).

CONCLUSIONS: Work-related stress is associated with unhealthy lifestyles and the absence of stress is associated with healthy lifestyles, but longitudinal analyses suggest no straightforward cause-effect relationship between work-related stress and lifestyle.

DOI10.2105/AJPH.2012.301090
Alternate JournalAm J Public Health
PubMed ID23678931
PubMed Central IDPMC4984954
Grant ListRG/13/2/30098 / / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom
G19/35 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0100222 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
/ / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
RG/10/005/28296 / / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom
G8802774 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0902037 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MR/K026992/1 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G1000616 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0701830 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MR/K013351/1 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0601647 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
RG/07/008/23674 / / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom