TitleJob strain and cardiovascular disease risk factors: meta-analysis of individual-participant data from 47,000 men and women.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsNyberg, ST, Fransson, EI, Heikkilä, K, Alfredsson, L, Casini, A, Clays, E, De Bacquer, D, Dragano, N, Erbel, R, Ferrie, JE, Hamer, M, Jöckel, K-H, Kittel, F, Knutsson, A, Ladwig, K-H, Lunau, T, Marmot, MG, Nordin, M, Rugulies, R, Siegrist, J, Steptoe, A, Westerholm, PJM, Westerlund, H, Theorell, T, Brunner, EJ, Singh-Manoux, A, Batty, GD, Kivimäki, M
Corporate AuthorsIPD-Work Consortium
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue6
Paginatione67323
Date Published2013
ISSN1932-6203
KeywordsCardiovascular Diseases, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Humans, Male, Odds Ratio, Risk Factors, Stress, Psychological, Work
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Job strain is associated with an increased coronary heart disease risk, but few large-scale studies have examined the relationship of this psychosocial characteristic with the biological risk factors that potentially mediate the job strain - heart disease association.

METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We pooled cross-sectional, individual-level data from eight studies comprising 47,045 participants to investigate the association between job strain and the following cardiovascular disease risk factors: diabetes, blood pressure, pulse pressure, lipid fractions, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, obesity, and overall cardiovascular disease risk as indexed by the Framingham Risk Score. In age-, sex-, and socioeconomic status-adjusted analyses, compared to those without job strain, people with job strain were more likely to have diabetes (odds ratio 1.29; 95% CI: 1.11-1.51), to smoke (1.14; 1.08-1.20), to be physically inactive (1.34; 1.26-1.41), and to be obese (1.12; 1.04-1.20). The association between job strain and elevated Framingham risk score (1.13; 1.03-1.25) was attributable to the higher prevalence of diabetes, smoking and physical inactivity among those reporting job strain.

CONCLUSIONS: In this meta-analysis of work-related stress and cardiovascular disease risk factors, job strain was linked to adverse lifestyle and diabetes. No association was observed between job strain, clinic blood pressure or blood lipids.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0067323
Alternate JournalPLoS ONE
PubMed ID23840664
PubMed Central IDPMC3688665
Grant ListRG/13/2/30098 / / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom
G19/35 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0100222 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
K013351 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G8802774 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0902037 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MR/K026992/1 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G1000616 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0701830 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
R01AG034454 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01HL036310 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
/ / Wellcome Trust / United Kingdom
G0601647 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
RG/07/008/23674 / / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom