TitleIntervention effects on safety compliance and citizenship behaviors: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsHammer, LB, Johnson, RC, Crain, TL, Bodner, T, Kossek, EErnst, Chandler, KD, Kelly, EL, Buxton, OM, Karuntzos, G, L Chosewood, C, Berkman, L
JournalJ Appl Psychol
Volume101
Issue2
Pagination190-208
Date Published2016 Feb
ISSN1939-1854
KeywordsAdult, Conflict (Psychology), Delivery of Health Care, Employment, Family, Female, Humans, Male, Organizational Culture, Random Allocation, Safety, Social Behavior
Abstract
 

We tested the effects of a work-family intervention on employee reports of safety compliance and organizational citizenship behaviors in 30 health care facilities using a group-randomized trial. Based on conservation of resources theory and the work-home resources model, we hypothesized that implementing a work-family intervention aimed at increasing contextual resources via supervisor support for work and family, and employee control over work time, would lead to improved personal resources and increased employee performance on the job in the form of self-reported safety compliance and organizational citizenship behaviors. Multilevel analyses used survey data from 1,524 employees at baseline and at 6-month and 12-month postintervention follow-ups. Significant intervention effects were observed for safety compliance at the 6-month, and organizational citizenship behaviors at the 12-month, follow-ups. More specifically, results demonstrate that the intervention protected against declines in employee self-reported safety compliance and organizational citizenship behaviors compared with employees in the control facilities. The hypothesized mediators of perceptions of family-supportive supervisor behaviors, control over work time, and work-family conflict (work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict) were not significantly improved by the intervention. However, baseline perceptions of family-supportive supervisor behaviors, control over work time, and work-family climate were significant moderators of the intervention effect on the self-reported safety compliance and organizational citizenship behavior outcomes.

DOI10.1037/apl0000047
Alternate JournalJ Appl Psychol
PubMed ID26348479
PubMed Central IDPMC4564872
Grant ListU01OH008788 / OH / NIOSH CDC HHS / United States
R01HL107240 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD051217 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
WFA9 / / Intramural CDC HHS / United States
U01 HD051256 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01HD059773 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01HD051276 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01AG027669 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
U01 OH008788 / OH / NIOSH CDC HHS / United States
U01HD051217 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01 AG027669 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL107240 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD059773 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD051276 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD051218 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01HD051256 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01HD051218 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States