TitleInfluence of maternal and paternal IQ on offspring health and health behaviours: evidence for some trans-generational associations using the 1958 British birth cohort study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsWhitley, E, Gale, CR, Deary, IJ, Kivimäki, M, Singh-Manoux, A, Batty, GD
JournalEur Psychiatry
Volume28
Issue4
Pagination219-24
Date Published2013 May
ISSN1778-3585
KeywordsAdolescent, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, Female, Health Behavior, Humans, Intelligence, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Parent-Child Relations, Parents, Risk Factors, United Kingdom
Abstract

PURPOSE: Individuals scoring poorly on tests of intelligence (IQ) have been reported as having increased risk of morbidity, premature mortality, and risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, poor diet, alcohol and cigarette consumption. Very little is known about the impact of parental IQ on the health and health behaviours of their offspring.

METHODS: We explored associations of maternal and paternal IQ scores with offspring television viewing, injuries, hospitalisations, long standing illness, height and BMI at ages 4 to 18 using data from the National Child Development Study (1958 birth cohort).

RESULTS: Data were available for 1446 mother-offspring and 822 father-offspring pairs. After adjusting for potential confounding/mediating factors, the children of higher IQ parents were less likely to watch TV (odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for watching 3+ vs. less than 3hours per week associated with a standard deviation increase in maternal or paternal IQ: 0.75 (0.64, 0.88) or 0.78 (0.64, 0.95) respectively) and less likely to have one or more injuries requiring hospitalisation (0.77 (0.66, 0.90) or 0.72 (0.56, 0.91) respectively for maternal or paternal IQ).

CONCLUSIONS: Children whose parents have low IQ scores may have poorer selected health and health behaviours. Health education might usefully be targeted at these families.

DOI10.1016/j.eurpsy.2012.01.005
Alternate JournalEur. Psychiatry
PubMed ID22541368
PubMed Central IDPMC3696866
Grant ListG1001799 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_UP_A620_1015 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_U147585827 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
R01 HL036310 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
G19/35 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_U130059821 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0100222 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_UU_12011/2 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G8802774 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_U147585819 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0902037 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
R01 AG034454 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
MR/K026992/1 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_UP_A620_1014 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
R01HL036310-20A2 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
G0700704 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
R01AG034454 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
G0400491 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_U147585824 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
RG/07/008/23674 / / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom