TitleHigher reproductive concerns associated with fertility consultation: a cross-sectional study of young adult male cancer survivors.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsDrizin, JH, Whitcomb, BW, Hsieh, T-C, Gorman, JR
JournalSupport Care Cancer
Date Published05/2020
ISSN1433-7339
Abstract
 

PURPOSE: This study examined associations between fertility consultation (FC) and multiple dimensions of reproductive concerns among young adult (YA) male cancer survivors.

METHODS: One hundred and seventy YA male cancer survivors (age 18 to 35) across the USA completed an online survey between 2016 and 2018. Participants reported demographics, receipt of FC, and reproductive concerns. Reproductive concerns were measured multidimensionally using the Reproductive Concerns after Cancer-Male scale. We used log binomial regression to examine associations between FC and high reproductive concerns across multiple domains.

RESULTS: In multivariate analyses adjusting for desire for children, FC was associated with higher likelihood of having at least one high reproductive concern (relative risk [RR] 1.4, 95% CI 1.2-1.7). Across subscales, FC was associated with greater likelihood of having high concerns about fertility potential (RR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-3.0), achieving pregnancy (RR 3.5, 95% CI 1.3-9.5), their (potential) child's health (RR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.2), and disclosing infertility to a partner (RR 2.7, 95% CI 1.8-4.1). In contrast, associations were not observed between FC and likelihood of high concerns about personal health (RR 1.4, 95% CI 0.5-3.8) or acceptance of infertility (RR 1.8, 95% CI 0.8-3.9).

CONCLUSIONS: YA male cancer survivors who received FC were more likely to have high reproductive concerns than those who did not receive FC. Men who seek out FC after cancer diagnosis may need additional support for their reproductive concerns. Research is needed to identify strategies to alleviate these concerns among this population.

DOI10.1007/s00520-020-05527-5
Alternate JournalSupport Care Cancer
PubMed ID32451700