TitleHigh-Dietary Alpha-Tocopherol or Mixed Tocotrienols Have No Effect on Bone Mass, Density, or Turnover in Male Rats During Skeletal Maturation.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsTennant, KG, Leonard, SW, Wong, CP, Iwaniec, UT, Turner, RT, Traber, M
JournalJ Med Food
Volume20
Issue7
Pagination700-708
Date Published07/2017
ISSN1557-7600
Keywordsalpha-Tocopherol, Animals, Bone Density, Dietary Supplements, Femur, Humans, Liver, Male, Osteocalcin, Osteoporosis, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Tibia, Tocotrienols
Abstract
 

High levels of alpha-tocopherol, the usual vitamin E supplement, are reported to decrease bone mass in rodents; however, the effects of other vitamin E forms on the skeleton are unknown. To test the hypothesis that high intakes of various vitamin E forms or the vitamin E metabolite, carboxyethyl hydroxy chromanol, were detrimental to bone status, Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6 per group, 11-week males) for 18 weeks consumed semipurified diets that contained adequate alpha-tocopherol, high alpha-tocopherol (500 mg/kg diet), or 50% Tocomin (250 mg mixed tocopherols and tocotrienols/kg diet). Vitamin E status was evaluated by measuring plasma, liver, and bone marrow vitamin E concentrations. Bone density, microarchitecture (cross-sectional volume, cortical volume, marrow volume, cortical thickness, and cancellous bone volume fraction, trabecular number, thickness, and spacing), and cancellous bone formation were assessed in the tibia using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, microcomputed tomography, and histomorphometry, respectively. In addition, serum osteocalcin was assessed as a global marker of bone turnover; gene expression in response to treatment was evaluated in the femur using targeted (osteogenesis related) gene profiling. No significant differences were detected between treatment groups for any of the bone endpoints measured. Vitamin E supplementation, either as alpha-tocopherol or mixed tocotrienols, while increasing vitamin E concentrations both in plasma and tissues, had no effect on the skeleton in rats.

DOI10.1089/jmf.2016.0147
Alternate JournalJ Med Food
PubMed ID28384008