TitleCognitive ability and personality as predictors of participation in a national colorectal cancer screening programme: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsGale, CR, Deary, IJ, Wardle, J, Zaninotto, P, Batty, GD
JournalJ Epidemiol Community Health
Volume69
Issue6
Pagination530-5
Date Published06/2015
ISSN1470-2738
KeywordsAged, Cognition, Colorectal Neoplasms, Cross-Sectional Studies, Early Detection of Cancer, England, Female, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Mass Screening, Middle Aged, Occult Blood, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Socioeconomic Factors, State Medicine
Abstract
 

BACKGROUND: The English NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme has offered biennial faecal occult blood testing to people aged 60-69 years since 2006, and to those aged 60-74 years since 2010. Analysis of the first 2.6 million screening invitations found that 54% of eligible people took up the invitation. The reasons for this low uptake are unclear. We investigated whether participation in screening varies according to cognitive ability and personality.

METHODS: Participants were members of The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. In 2010-2011, respondents were asked about participation in bowel cancer screening, and cognitive ability and the 'Big Five' personality traits were assessed. Logistic regression was used to examine the cross-sectional relationships between cognitive ability and personality and screening participation in 2681 people aged 60-75 years who were eligible to have been invited to take part in the UK national screening programme for bowel cancer.

RESULTS: In age-adjusted and sex-adjusted analyses, better cognition and higher conscientiousness were associated with increased participation in cancer screening. ORs (95% CIs) per SD increase were 1.10 (1.03 to 1.18) for cognitive ability and 1.10 (1.01 to 1.19) for conscientiousness. After further adjustment for household wealth and health literacy-shown previously to be associated with participation-these associations were attenuated (ORs were 1.07 (1.00 to 1.15) and 1.07 (0.97 to 1.18), respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: We found some indication that better cognitive function and greater conscientiousness may be linked with a slightly increased likelihood of participation in bowel cancer screening. These relationships need investigation in other cohorts of older people.

DOI10.1136/jech-2014-204888
Alternate JournalJ Epidemiol Community Health
PubMed ID25648994
PubMed Central IDPMC4453587
Grant ListMC_UP_A620_1015 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_UU_12011/2 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
/ / Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council / United Kingdom
MR/K026992/1 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
R01 AG017644 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
G0700704 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom