TitleCharacterizing Caregiving Intensity Among Mexican-origin Women Caregivers.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsAnthony, KP, Geldhof, GJ, Mendez-Luck, CA
JournalGerontologist
Volume57
Issue6
Pagination1084-1092
Date Published11/2017
ISSN1758-5341
KeywordsAged, Caregivers, Cost of Illness, Cultural Characteristics, Emigrants and Immigrants, Female, Humans, Mexican Americans, Middle Aged, Oregon, Physical Exertion, Sex Factors, Stress, Psychological
Abstract
 

Purpose of the Study: Objective (physical) caregiving burden has not often been associated with subjective (emotional) burden among Mexican-origin women caregivers. Yet, many studies show that Latina caregivers suffer from negative psychological outcomes related to caregiving at a higher rate than non-Latino Whites. This study considered whether self-rated intensity of ADL/IADL support explained the relationship between number of care recipient illnesses and caregiver emotional drain among Mexican American women caregivers.

Design and Methods: Participants included Mexican-origin women caregivers (n = 132) in East Los Angeles, CA who completed a survey that asked culturally appropriate questions about their experiences caring for elderly relatives.

Results: Logistic regression models indicated that ADL/IADL supports ranked as difficult were also chosen as causing emotional drain. Mediation models revealed a significant indirect effect of number of care recipient illnesses on caregiver emotional drain for English-speaking caregivers but not for Spanish-speaking caregivers. These results indicate that Mexican-origin women caregivers do experience subjective burden associated with specific objective ADL/IADL supports and suggest that culturally relevant survey design can assist in better understanding the emotional drain among this population.

Implications: Cultural values should be considered when discussing aspects of care provision with Mexican-origin women caregivers in order to elicit an accurate description of their informal caregiving experiences that may contribute to caregiver burden.

DOI10.1093/geront/gnw090
Alternate JournalGerontologist
PubMed ID27342442
PubMed Central IDPMC5881690
Grant ListP30 AG021684 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
K01 AG033122 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States