TitleBody mass index: accounting for full time sedentary occupation and 24-hr self-reported time use.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsTudor-Locke, C, Schuna, Jr, JM, Katzmarzyk, PT, Liu, W, Hamrick, KS, Johnson, WD
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue10
Paginatione109051
Date Published2014
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We used linked existing data from the 2006-2008 American Time Use Survey (ATUS), the Current Population Survey (CPS, a federal survey that provides on-going U.S. vital statistics, including employment rates) and self-reported body mass index (BMI) to answer: How does BMI vary across full time occupations dichotomized as sedentary/non-sedentary, accounting for time spent in sleep, other sedentary behaviors, and light, moderate, and vigorous intensity activities? METHODS: We classified time spent engaged at a primary job (sedentary or non-sedentary), sleep, and other non-work, non-sleep intensity-defined behaviors, specifically, sedentary behavior, light, moderate, and vigorous intensity activities. Age groups were defined by 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, and 50-64 years. BMI groups were defined by 18.5-24.9, 25.0-27.4, 27.5-29.9, 30.0-34.9, and ≥35.0 kg/m2. Logistic and linear regression were used to examine the association between BMI and employment in a sedentary occupation, considering time spent in sleep, other non-work time spent in sedentary behaviors, and light, moderate, and vigorous intensity activities, sex, age race/ethnicity, and household income. RESULTS: The analysis data set comprised 4,092 non-pregnant, non-underweight individuals 20-64 years of age who also reported working more than 7 hours at their primary jobs on their designated time use reporting day. Logistic and linear regression analyses failed to reveal any associations between BMI and the sedentary/non-sedentary occupation dichotomy considering time spent in sleep, other non-work time spent in sedentary behaviors, and light, moderate, and vigorous intensity activities, sex, age, race/ethnicity, and household income. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of a relationship between self-reported full time sedentary occupation classification and BMI after accounting for sex, age, race/ethnicity, and household income and 24-hours of time use including non-work related physical activity and sedentary behaviors. The various sources of error associated with self-report methods and assignment of generalized activity and occupational intensity categories could compound to obscure any real relationships.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0109051