TitleThe acute effects of a warm-up including static or dynamic stretching on countermovement jump height, reaction time, and flexibility.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsPerrier, ET, Pavol, M, Hoffman, MA
JournalJ Strength Cond Res
Volume25
Issue7
Pagination1925-31
Date Published07/2011
ISSN1533-4287
KeywordsAdult, Analysis of Variance, Athletic Performance, Humans, Male, Movement, Muscle Contraction, Muscle Stretching Exercises, Muscle, Skeletal, Reaction Time, Thigh, Young Adult
Abstract
 

The purpose of this research was to compare the effects of a warm-up with static vs. dynamic stretching on countermovement jump (CMJ) height, reaction time, and low-back and hamstring flexibility and to determine whether any observed performance deficits would persist throughout a series of CMJs. Twenty-one recreationally active men (24.4 ± 4.5 years) completed 3 data collection sessions. Each session included a 5-minute treadmill jog followed by 1 of the stretch treatments: no stretching (NS), static stretching (SS), or dynamic stretching (DS). After the jog and stretch treatment, the participant performed a sit-and-reach test. Next, the participant completed a series of 10 maximal-effort CMJs, during which he was asked to jump as quickly as possible after seeing a visual stimulus (light). The CMJ height and reaction time were determined from measured ground reaction forces. A treatment × jump repeated-measures analysis of variance for CMJ height revealed a significant main effect of treatment (p = 0.004). The CMJ height was greater for DS (43.0 cm) than for NS (41.4 cm) and SS (41.9 cm) and was not less for SS than for NS. Analysis also revealed a significant main effect of jump (p = 0.005) on CMJ height: Jump height decreased from the early to the late jumps. The analysis of reaction time showed no significant effect of treatment. Treatment had a main effect (p < 0.001) on flexibility, however. Flexibility was greater after both SS and DS compared to after NS, with no difference in flexibility between SS and DS. Athletes in sports requiring lower-extremity power should use DS techniques in warm-up to enhance flexibility while improving performance.

DOI10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181e73959
Alternate JournalJ Strength Cond Res
PubMed ID21701282