The Oregon Market Price Study identifies child care prices and the geographic distribution of these prices across the state. Prices vary by several factors including the age of the child served, type of care (family child care, center, certified family care), the local supply and demand for child care, and facilities’ perceptions of the capacity of families to pay for care.

The Oregon Market Price Study examines geographic patterns in the prices charged by facilities by age of child served, type of care, and pricing modes (hourly, monthly, etc). This study fulfills the federal requirement that the state complete a market price survey every two years.


2016 Oregon Child Care Market Price Study (Research Report)

2016 Oregon Child Care Market Price Study

Author(s): Deana Grobe and Roberta B. Weber
Published: October, 2016

Findings 2016

  • Between 1994 and 2016 statewide prices for center care for a toddler increased 130% and for small home-based care 100%. Data for large home-based providers were available for the years 2000 through 2016. In that period their prices increased 60%.
  • Child care markets are local with variation among communities.

Conclusions 2016

  • Child care prices vary across the state, with three types of markets for small home-based care and four types of markets for centers and large home-based care.
  • CCR&R data continues to provide a reliable and cost-effective source of data for statewide market price studies.
  • Prices should continue to be reported for both child care facilities and slots. Analysis should be based on slots since this most accurately represents what families experience when purchasing care.
  • CCR&Rs or the new 211 child care unit should continue to collect price information in the mode(s) that reflect how facilities charge.
  • Analysis of the predominant mode (hourly, daily, weekly, monthly) used by facilities to charge parents identified hourly as the most common mode for small home-based care and monthly for center and large home-based care.

Download the full 2016 report


2014 Oregon Child Care Market Price Study (Research Report)

2014 Oregon Child Care Market Price Study

Author(s): Deana Grobe and Roberta B. Weber
Published: October, 2014

Findings 2014

  • Between 1994 and 2014 statewide prices increased for most ages and types of care.
  • Child care markets are local with variation among communities.

Conclusions 2014

  • Child care prices vary across the state, with three types of markets for small home-based care and four types of markets for centers and large home-based
    care.
  • CCR&R data continues to provide a reliable and cost-effective source of data for statewide market price studies.
  • Prices should continue to be reported for both child care facilities and slots. Analysis should be based on slots since this most accurately represents what families experience when purchasing care.
  • CCR&Rs should continue to collect price information in the mode(s) that reflect how facilities charge.
  • Analysis of the predominant mode (hourly, daily, weekly, monthly) used by facilities to charge parents identified hourly as the most common mode for small home-based care and monthly for center and large home-based care.

Download the full 2014 report


2012 Oregon Child Care Market Price Study (Research Report)

2012 Oregon Child Care Market Price Study

Author(s): Deana Grobe and Roberta B. Weber
Published: September, 2012

Findings 2012

  • Between 1994 and 2012 statewide prices increased for most ages and types of care.
  • Child care markets are local with variation among communities.
  • The percent of slots that can be purchased with the value of DHS payment rates decreased from 64% to 58% between 2010 and 2012.

Download the full 2012 report


2010 Oregon Child Care Market Price Study (Research Report)

2010 Oregon Child Care Market Price StudyAuthor(s): Deana Grobe and Roberta B. Weber
Published: October, 2010

Findings 2010

  • Between 1994 and 2010 statewide prices increased for most ages and types of care.
  • Child care markets are local with variation among communities.
  • The percent of slots that can be purchased with the value of DHS payment rates decreased from 68 percent to 64 percent between 2008 and 2010.

Download the full 2010 report


2009 Child Care Subsidies & Chid Care Markets: Evidence from Three States (Technical Report)

(Authors): Elizabeth E. Davis, NaiChia Li, Roberta B. Weber, Deana Grobe

The goal of this study was to increase understanding of the factors influencing child care prices and, in particular, the relationship between child care subsidy expenditures and prices. The conceptual model of a market was the basic framework for the analysis. Using methodology pioneered in California, this study used data from Oregon to analyze the influence of a number of economic, demographic and policy variables on child care prices. The results were then compared to earlier studies in California and Minnesota.

Published: March, 2009

 

2008 Oregon Child Care Market Price Study (Research Report)

(Authors): Deana Grobe and Roberta B. Weber

The 2009 Market Price Study identifies child care prices or rates and the geographic distribution of these rates across the state. Rates vary by several factors including the age of child served, type of care (family child care, center, group home), the local supply and demand for child care, and providers' perceptions of the capacity of families to pay for care.

Published: July, 2008

 

Study of Market Prices: Validating Child Care Market Rate Surveys (Technical Report)

Author(s): Deana Grobe, Roberta B. Weber, Elizabeth E. Davis, J. Lee Kreader, Clara C. Pratt

This paper reports the findings of how to increase the validity of market rate survey price findings. It includes analyses of data from six diverse states that address the challenges made to market rate study validity. Specifically, the report evaluates the effect of using various data sources and data collection methods on market representation, market price findings, and cost effectiveness on producing child care market price findings. The Validity Study is one of three components of a study designed to provide guidance to states on producing valid findings with market rate surveys.

Published: September, 2008

 

Tribal Child Care and Development Fund Grantees: Market Rate Surveys and Other Child Care Practices and Policies

Author(s): Roberta B. Weber, Deana Grobe
This brief describes the findings from two surveys with tribes that receive CCDF funds in 2004. First, we describe basic child care practices of all tribal CCDF grantees. Following that, we describe the survey practices and policies of the 28 tribes that used findings of their own child care market rate survey.
te.edu/familypolicy/occrp/assets/Survey_of_States_Report_FINAL.pdf
Published: August, 2007

 

Practices and Policies: Market Rate Surveys in States, Territories, and Tribes (Research Report)

Author(s): Roberta B. Weber, Deana Grobe, Elizabeth E. Davis, J. Lee Kreader, Clara C. Pratt
A presentation of findings from a study examining current child care market rate survey methods, practices, and policies in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, and the 28 federally-recognized tribes that conduct their own market rate surveys, includes findings on challenges faced by jurisdictions in conducting and using findings from surveys, description of how jurisdictions provided study data, and findings and discussion on the use of market rate surveys to produce valid data.
Published: May, 2007

Additional Study Documentation

 

2006 Oregon Child Care Market Rate Study (Research Report)

Author(s): Deana Grobe, Clara Pratt, Roberta Weber
The 2006 Market Rate Study identifies child care prices or rates and the geographic distribution of these rates across the state. Rates vary by several factors including the age of child served, type of care (family child care, center, group home), the local supply and demand for child care, and providers' perceptions of the capacity of families to pay for care.
Published:August, 2006

 

Market Rate Study Guidebook: A Guide to Implementing a Child Care Market Rate Study Using Child Care Resource & Referral Data (Guidebook)

Author(s): Deana Grobe, Roberta Weber, Clara Pratt, Arthur Emlen
This guide was developed to assist states and researchers in conducting a child care market rate study using the CCR&R data. States may be interested in using this approach, given that use of CCR&R data: (1) supports analysis of statewide market rates and geographic distribution of rates; (2) facilitates analysis of child care accessibility for those receiving child care subsidies; (3) provides convenient, inexpensive, and accessible data; (4) facilitates comparison of market rates over time; (5) reflects the complexity of the child care market; and (6) includes providers who are regularly and actively seeking business. Although several guides have been written that discuss how to conduct a market rate study using surveys, the contribution of this guidebook is to illustrate how Oregon has used CCR&R data to study market rates and to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of this approach. Description of this market rate methodology also lays out lessons learned from the work of the Oregon Child Care Research Partnership in its efforts to build a body of policy-relevant research methodology.
Published: September, 2003

 

2002 Oregon Child Care Market Rate Study (Research Report)

Author(s): Deana Grobe, Clara Pratt, Roberta Weber
The 2002 Market Rate Study identifies child care prices or rates and the geographic distribution of these rates across the state. Rates vary by several factors including the age of child served, type of care (family child care, center, group home), the local supply and demand for child care, and providers’ perceptions of the capacity of families to pay for care.
Published: January, 2003

 

2000 Oregon Child Care Market Rate Study (Research Report)

Author(s): Deana Grobe, Clara Pratt
The purpose of the year 2000 Oregon market rate study was to identify child care market rates and the geographic distribution of these rates across the state. Based on the identified rate distribution, geographic rate areas were recommended to guide Adult and Family Services (AFS) in establishing provider payment policies.
Published: September, 2000

 

Oregon Child Care Market Rate Study (Research Report)

Author(s): Karen Tvedt, Arthur Emlen
In December 1998, the Adult and Family Services Division (AFS) of the Oregon Department of Human Resources (DHR) contracted with the Portland State University Regional Research Institute to conduct a telephone survey of child care providers to obtain up-to-date market rate information. This document reports the results of that survey as well as background information regarding the survey process and methodology.
Published: March, 1999

 

Market Rate, 1994: Sampling the Price of Child Care in Oregon (Research Report)

Author(s): Arthur Emlen
This report presents the findings of the 1994 market-rate study, most specifically by reporting the 75th percentile rate charged for each kind of care found in communities throughout the state of Oregon.
Published: April, 1995

 

The 1992 Oregon Child Care Rates (Research Report)

Author(s): Arthur Emlen
Under the Family Support Act, federal-state policy calls for subsidizing the child care of families who are trying to make it from welfare into the labor force. In order to facilitate this transition, the government empowers these families financially to be competitive in finding and purchasing child care in the local community where they live and work. This is done by pegging the subsidy at the 75th percentile of prices found in the community based on a survey of child care rates.
Published: September, 1992

 

Analysis of Child Care Rates in Oregon (Research Report)

Author(s): Arthur Emlen
This report to Adult and Family services is an analysis of the rates that Oregon child care providers report charging for the care of infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and school-age children. The report consists of: (1) a recommended rate schedule for family day care and center care in Oregon based on analyses of the geographic variation in rates for infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and school-age children, (2) a discussion of the results of the analysis and of the methodological issues involved, and (3) a discussion of the results of an analysis of child care expenditures from a sample of Oregon employees (demand data) for comparison with and validation of the child care rates reported by providers (supply data).
Published: March, 1990