TitlePhysical Activity and Physical Fitness of School-Aged Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsTyler, K, Macdonald, M, Menear, K
JournalAutism Research and Treatment
Volume2014228261452862763
Issue42332141
Pagination1 - 6
Date Published2014
Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by impairments in social communication deficits and the presence of restricted and repetitive behaviors, interests, or activities. Literature comparing the physical activity and fitness of children with ASD to typically developing peers is in need of attention. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the physical activity and fitness of school-aged children with ASD () in comparison to typically developing peers (). Participants with ASD completed diagnostic and developmental assessments and a series of physical fitness assessments: 20-meter multistage shuttle, sit-and-reach test, handgrip strength, and body mass index. Physical activity was measured using accelerometry and preestablished cut-points of physical activity (Freedson et al., 2005). MANCOVA revealed significant between-group effects in strength (), while ANCOVA revealed significant between-group effects in sedentary (), light (), moderate (), and total moderate-to-vigorous () physical activity. Children with ASD are less physically active and fit than typically developing peers. Adapted physical activity programs are one avenue with intervention potential to combat these lower levels of physical activity and fitness found in children with ASD.

DOI10.1155/2014/312163