The Kindergarten Readiness Research Program focuses on measuring and improving self-regulation skills in young children through the development of a measure (Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders) and research-based intervention (Red Light, Purple Light!). We are currently working on 5 funded research projects: 

Measuring Self-Regulation:

  • Touch Your Toes! Developing a New Measure of Behavioral Regulation; Principal Investigator: Megan McClelland (Oregon State University); Co-Investigator(s): Alan Acock (Oregon State University), Claire Cameron (University of Virginia), Ryan Bowles (Michigan State University); Years: 2010-2016, Funding: Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. 
    • Description: This five-year project will adapt a self-regulation measure (the HTKS) as a school readiness screening tool that can be easily used by teachers, practitioners, and researchers to identify children who would benefit from additional support in self-regulation. 
  • Developing a Measure of Self-Regulation for Children at Risk for School Difficulty; Principal Investigator: Megan McClelland (Oregon State University); Co-Principal Investigator(s): Claire Cameron (University at Buffalo, SUNY), Ryan Bowles (Michigan State University); Co-Investigator: John Geldhof (Oregon State University); Years: 2015-2019; Funding: Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. 
    • Description: This four-year project will revise an existing measure of self-regulation (the HTKS) for use as a school readiness screening tool for children from at-risk backgrounds. The existing HTKS is a predictor of school achievement for diverse groups of children. However, English language learners (ELLs) and children from low-income background have not performed well on the measure. The research team will develop and validate a revised version of the measure to assess self-regulation skills of preschoolers who are at risk.

Improving Self-Regulation:

  • Red Light, Purple Light! Developing a Self-Regulation Intervention for Children at Risk for School Difficulty; Principal Investigator: Megan McClelland (Oregon State University); Co-Investigator(s): Shauna Tominey (Yale University), Sara Schmitt (Purdue University), David Purpura (Purdue University), Bridget Hatfield (Oregon State University), Karen Thompson (Oregon State University); Years: 2015-2019, Funding: Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. 
    • Description: The purpose of this project is to develop and evaluate the promise of a self-regulation intervention designed for use with children from low-income backgrounds with the goal of promoting the development of school readiness skills. Math and literacy content will be embedded into self-regulation based activities to explore the added benefit of academic content on the development of self-regulation skills.
  • Using Technology to Promote Executive Function in Young Children; Principal Investigator: Megan McClelland (Oregon State University); Years: 2015-2016, Funding: Bezos Family Foundation. 
    • Description: The research team will develop a mobile app to facilitate the delivery of games and activities that have been developed to help children practice how to stop, think and THEN act.  These previously developed games and activities have been shown to be effective in two randomized control trials and were designed to promote self-regulation skills in young children.
  • Evaluation of a Mind in the Making-based Intervention Targeting 4-year-old Children; Principal Investigator: Megan McClelland (Oregon State University); Co-Investigator: Sara Schmitt (Purdue University); Years: 2015-2018; Funding: Families and Work Institute; W.K. Kellogg Foundation. 
    • Description: The primary aim of this project is to assess the impact of a Mind in the Making (MITM)-based intervention that targets teachers, preschool-age children, and parents. The intervention is designed to promote the healthy development of children’s executive function skills. Participating teachers and parents will receive training in the Seven Essential Skills Modules from MITM and circle time games (Tominey & McClelland, 2011).