The B.S. degree in Kinesiology (KIN) is designed to provide a strong foundation in the interdisciplinary field of Kinesiology. The program’s structure consists of three sections: KIN Core courses, Required Support Courses, and KIN Courses Beyond the Core (BtC) (see University Catalog: Kinesiology Undergraduate Major). Preparation for the many career paths possible in the KIN major is achieved through the specific advanced KIN courses selected to complete the BtC requirement.

This Kinesiology Advising Guide has been developed as a resource for students in selecting KIN courses that allow them to achieve their academic and professional goals. Distinct professional career directions form the organizing structure to the Advising Guide, including preparation for graduate study in the field. Students are encouraged to work closely with their advisors in developing a coherent selection of advanced KIN courses to fulfill the BtC requirement.

Students interested in careers in medicine, physical or occupational therapy, nursing, or as a physician’s assistant should consider taking the Pre-Therapy & Allied Health (PTAH) option in the KIN major. The PTAH option has specific tracks that are designed for entry into graduate programs in the medical and allied health fields. Students may apply for admission into the PTAH option after completing 90 credit hours while meeting specific academic performance standards (see University Catalog: Pre-Therapy and Allied Health Option).

Advising Guides for Professional Career Preparation

Fitness Leadership / Personal Trainer / Clinical Exercise Physiology

Listed below are recommended courses for academic and professional preparation to provide leadership for designing, directing, and managing physical fitness programs in business and industrial settings, health clubs, hospital-based fitness/wellness and cardiac rehabilitation programs, and as a personal trainer or fitness coach. These courses also serve as preparation for successfully completing professional certifications by the American College of Sports Medicine, the National Strength and Conditioning Association, the National Academy of Sports Medicine, and the American Council on Exercise. Practicum and internship experiential learning is highly recommended.

Experiential Learning Recommendations:

9 Experiential Learning credits can count toward the 24 total-credits required; credits beyond 9 will count as elective credits

Athletic Training

In order to become a certified athletic trainer, students will need to graduate from an accredited program in Athletic Training and pass the Board of Certification (BOC) exam. A list of accredited programs can be found at: http://caate.net/find-programs/

The following courses are suggested for students interested in the field of Athletic Training, such as the masters degree program in Athletic Training offered at OSU:

Adapted Physical Education/Activity & Physical Education

In order to enter a physical education/adapted physical education licensure program at any institution, students will need to graduate with specific courses/experiences related to working with children in a variety of physical activity settings. The following Courses Beyond the Core are suggested for students interested in the area of Adapted Physical Education/Activity & Physical Education.

Select at least 3 from the following 4 courses:

Experiential Learning

Also: experiential learning credits earned working with any of the following programs: IMPACT, IMPACT 4 Life, MS Exercise Program, Go Baby Go (note: it is necessary to volunteer with one of these programs for one term, or take KIN 444, before it is possible to earn experiential credit working with them in a subsequent term)

For those students who are planning to enter the Master of Adapted Physical Education Program at Oregon State University, the following supporting courses are required as prerequisites to apply.

  1. TCE 216. Purpose, Structure, and Function of Education in a Democracy (3)
  2. TCE 253. Learning Across the Lifespan (3)
  3. PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development (3)
    OR
    HDFS 311. Infant and Child Development (4)
    and
    HDFS 313. Adolescent Development (4)

Additional courses/experiences may be required at other institutions. Please refer to those programs for specific prerequisites.

Physical Activity and Public Health

This advising guide is intended for students interested in pursuing careers in Physical Activity and Public Health, with a primary focus on promoting physical activity in different community settings and population groups.

The following courses are suggested for students interested in the field of Physical Activity and Public Health. Please consult with the Advising Office of the College of Public Health and Human Sciences to select the appropriate mix of courses to meet your needs.

Graduate School/Research in Kinesiology

The B.S. degree in Kinesiology is designed to provide a strong foundation in the interdisciplinary field of Kinesiology, and students can shape their focus and prepare for graduate study through the Advanced Courses they choose to fulfill the KIN Courses Beyond the Core (BtC) section of the major. This section of the KIN Advising Guide provides guidance in course selection for entry into Kinesiology graduate programs with a focus on specific areas of concentration (e.g., exercise physiology, sport and exercise psychology, biomechanics, etc.), and the lists are organized accordingly. Graduate programs typically ask applicants to identify the area of concentration in which they wish to focus, but it is not necessary that all of their Advanced Courses have that particular focus. Students may select Advanced Courses of most interest to them, keeping in mind that they should ensure that the coursework provides the basis for entry into competitive graduate programs.

Please note that the sections below may list courses that exceed or fall short of the minimum 24 credits required to fulfill the KIN BtC requirement. The purpose of these guides is to list courses that align with the areas of concentration. As always, student should work with their advisors to select the specific courses they will take to fulfill the BtC requirement.

In addition to KIN courses, taking courses from other disciplines might enhance preparation for admission into graduate programs in some areas. Some sections below suggest non-KIN courses that can strengthen a student’s preparation for study in that area of concentration. Please be aware that while these courses are relevant to the area of concentration, because they are not KIN courses, they do not count toward meeting the BtC credit requirement.

Exercise Physiology

Exercise physiology is the study of the effects of exercise on the various systems of the body, particularly the cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular, skeletal, and endocrine. Graduate study in exercise physiology can lead to careers in such areas as academics, research, coaching, and fitness assessment, exercise programming, and fitness/wellness program administration in clinical, sport, commercial, or corporate settings.

Suggested KIN advanced courses:

Suggested non-KIN courses:

Neuromechanics (Motor Learning and Control; Biomechanics)

Neuromechanics includes the sub-disciplines of biomechanics and motor control. It focuses on how the nervous system and musculoskeletal system function to produce human movement, with application to musculoskeletal health and performance. Graduate study in neuromechanics can lead to careers in such areas as academics, research, clinical or sport movement analysis, product development (e.g. athletic equipment, prosthetics), forensics, ergonomics, and coaching.

Suggested KIN advanced courses:

Suggested non-KIN courses:

Physical Activity and Public Health

Physical Activity and Public Health involves the measurement and promotion of physical activity in different community settings and population groups. Graduate study in Physical Activity and Public Health can lead to careers in such areas as academics, research, and health promotion through private or public health agencies.

Suggested KIN advanced courses:

Sport and Exercise Psychology

Sport and Exercise Psychology addresses how social and psychological factors influence participation and performance in physical activity, and how involvement in physical activity influences the psychological make-up of the individual. Graduate study in sport and exercise psychology can lead to careers in such areas as academics, research, coaching, wellness and health promotion, and sports program administration.

Suggested KIN advanced courses:

Suggested non-KIN courses:

Bacc Core Course