TitleMedical mistrust, perceived discrimination, and satisfaction with health care among young-adult rural latinos.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsLópez-Cevallos, DF, Harvey, SM, Warren, J
JournalThe Journal of rural health : official journal of the American Rural Health Association and the National Rural Health Care Association
Volume30
Issue4
Pagination344-51
Date Published2014 Sep
Abstract

PURPOSE: Little research has analyzed mistrust and discrimination influencing receipt of health care services among Latinos, particularly those living in rural areas. This study examined the associations between medical mistrust, perceived discrimination, and satisfaction with health care among young-adult rural Latinos. RESEARCH DESIGN: This cross-sectional study analyzed data from 387 young-adult Latinos (ages 18-25) living in rural Oregon. The Behavioral Model of Vulnerable Populations was utilized as the theoretical framework. Correlations were run to assess bivariate associations among variables included in the study. Ordered logistic regression models evaluated the associations between medical mistrust, perceived discrimination, and satisfaction with health care. RESULTS: On average, participants used health services 4 times in the past year. Almost half of the participants had health insurance (46%). The majority reported that they were moderately (32%) or very satisfied (41%) with health care services used in the previous year. In multivariable models, medical mistrust and perceived discrimination were significantly associated with satisfaction with health care. CONCLUSIONS: Medical mistrust and perceived discrimination were significant contributors to lower satisfaction with health care among young-adult Latinos living in rural Oregon. Health care reform implementation, currently under way, provides a unique opportunity for developing evaluation systems and interventions toward monitoring and reducing rural Latino health care disparities.

DOI10.1111/jrh.12063